Conditional Statements

As math blog people may already know, Sam Shah has a great lesson up here to get students exploring and talking about conditional statements are truth values without just naming and assigning them. We tackled a modified version of the second part of the lesson in my Geo B class last week.

Modification includes: Mixing up the Truth Values. The original let students know the given statement was true. I took away that requirement and purposely added in some false ones. I also added in some that would be true regardless and false regardless. The result was we had posters with all the following patterns: TFFT, FTTF, TTTT, FFFF. This allowed us to have a deeper conversation on what finding truth value patterns might mean.

For our Gallery Walk, Students had a few minutes to walk around and read/think about the posters. Then I gave each student 5 (or more) post-its and they had to leave comments, corrections, or insights. When they finished, I handed them a recap sheet with 2 questions about the posters and a final Statement to practice the conditionals. We meant to have a whole class discussion afterwards, but this took the whole period. We started the next day with the discussion. This would have been better if it could have been same day, but it was still powerful. I got to play pestering questioner a lot. I like this. Asking students “Why?” and to defend themselves is fun. Its even more fun when they start doing it automatically.

Key Insights: Our students are amazing people. Even the ones that think they don’t know math have such powerful thoughts when we listen. So LISTEN! I wasn’t expecting the post-its to capture all of their thoughts, but just sitting back and listening to them talk among themselves and debate the post-its led to the deepest insights. I jotted notes, but I wish I had captured audio of the class.

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Author:

I am a math teacher at a public, alternative high school school. I’m the only math teacher at my site, so I get to teach it all. This is good. The bad? I have 7 different preps! Twitter: @altmath

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